Tournaments

 

In addition to reaching 3,135 K-8 students in 2015-2016 through after-school programming, Chess for Success presented tournaments that enabled approximately 1,900 K-12 students to participate in competitions. Following is a list of the tournaments hosted throughout the year and information for finalists.


Jan.-Feb.: Regional Tournaments are held at 24 sites throughout Oregon, ensuring that all K-12 students, regardless of whether there is a Chess for Success Club at their school or they are home-schooled, have an opportunity to participate and qualify for the state tournament. An entry fee is applicable for students who are not part of Chess for Success clubs.

March 10 and 11: The 50th Annual Chess for Success Oregon State Tournament at the Oregon Convention Center includes team finals for elementary and middle schools and individual finals for elementary (K-4), middle (5, 6, 7, 8), and high school (9-12). An entry fee is applicable for students who are not part of Chess for Success clubs. Please review the information for finalists.

TBD: City of Portland will be held in spring at schools in the Portland metro-area. All K-12 students are invited to participate, regardless of whether there is a Chess for Success Club at their school or they are home-schooled. Entry fees are applicable for students who are not part of Chess for Success.

Note: Tournaments are not rated. Early entry fees are available until Saturday midnight two weeks before the tournament ($21). Regular entry fees ($29) apply until Saturday midnight a week before the tournament. Late entry fees ($42) are charged if the entry is received after Saturday midnight a week before the tournament through Wednesday midnight before the tournament. Entries are not accepted after Wednesday midnight before the tournament and there are no entries accepted on site.

History of the Oregon State Chess Tournament 

1967: OMSI, with the sponsorship of The Oregonian, began hosting various scholastic chess tournaments, some at the museum in Washington Park, others in Eugene and Salem in the early 1970s.

1973: Twelve (12) regions were established, and the competition featured elementary and junior high team finals as well as elementary, junior high, and high school individual finals.

1981: The Oregonian dropped its sponsorship and OMSI ceded the organizational duties to the Oregon Chess Federation, but continued to host the tournaments.

1984: The Oregon Scholastic Chess Foundation (started by Chess for Success co-founder Dick Roy) replaced the Oregon Chess Federation as the operating organization.  

1998: Chess for Success accepted the responsibility of running the tournaments to ensure the continuation of this long-held tradition.